Monday, 3 May 2010

Hibiscus mutabilis

A large shrub or small multistemmed tree that grows up to 5m high with a ca. 3.5m spread.,It's in Malvaceae, the hibiscus family). Dropping its leaves in winter the shrub's slender stems seem to disappear among neighboring plants until midsummer, when it leafs out into a big bushy mass. The large leaves are13 - 18 cm), bright green, hirsute on the undersides and deeply lobed. They impart a coarse texture that gives the plant a distinctive eye-catching appeal. Hibiscus mutabilis is downright conspicuous when in full bloom.. The most notable characteristic of this flowering shrub is that flowers of three distinct colors appear on the bush simultaneously as the blooms color cycle independent of one another. Single and double flowered varieties are available, both having quite large blossoms that are 8 - 13 cm across. After flowering a round, hairy capsule forms which dries and releases fuzzy seeds.

Hibiscus mutabilis is native to southern China but is a favorite landscape plant in mild winter climates.


Little to no care required. This shrub truly takes care of itself and is adaptable to most locations and soil conditions.

This shrub thrives on regular watering but this is optional as it is very drought tolerant.


Three attributes make this a highly desirable shrub - it's drought tolerant, low maintenance and has spectacular flowers. True to its botanical name (mutabilis), it is mutable, it's flowers changing color with age.
Propagate by cuttings, it makes roots easily.

Believe it or not:
Do not look to the ground for your next step, greatness lies with those who look to the horizon.
Norwegian proverb.



Read about Perfume go to Titania Everyday


15 comments:

diane said...

A beautiful plant. Great info. I must get one.

Sunita said...

This is so pretty! We had this growing in the garden of my college hostel and seeing it here brings so many memories. I must try to find one for my own garden.

Kathy said...

That is one beautiful hibiscus. I am particularly partial to pink!

Floridagirl said...

That is a beautiful plant, and very interesting with its mutating blooms. I want one!

Barbarapc said...

I wonder if this is one that we could winter inside - it's so lovely - reading your blog always makes me long for a tropical garden.

Babara said...

Wenn ich mir die Blätter so ansehe, dann muss dieser Hibiskus derjenige sein, den wir hier als Zimmerpflanze halten können. Allerdings habe ich ihn noch nie zweifarbig und so schön gefüllt gesehen wie hier bei dir. Hier wird er vorallem rot, orange und gelb verkauft. Ob es sich wohl um ein und dieselbe Pflanze handelt die du H.mutabilis nennst?
E Huufe liebi Grüess us emene rägenasse Garte (dr Räge isch aber e Säge im Momänt!),
Barbara

Kilauea Poetry said...

Hi there Titania! How have you been? I see your garden has been growing good, ha. Beautiful flowers- lovley hybiscus here. I enjoyed your skywatch photo of the glistening sea below too! Fantastic!!
Hope you have a wonderful week, Regina-

Katarina said...

Ah, I've never seen Hibiscus mutabilies in real life, but I've been admiring pictures of it. Seems to be a beautiful plant!

Nicole said...

I have 4 grown from seeds but they haven't bloom yet-looking forward to that!

Ami said...

Those large and color-changing flowers look so lovely! Thanks for sharing!

Stephanie said...

Sounds like a 'giant' hibiscus ha ha... Its changing colour blooms are beautiful. Love both white and purple. It is surprising to know that they require little care. Thanks for posting Titania :-D

Laura in Paris said...

WOW, what a beautiful hibiscus! I was given one sometime ago, but it did not survive Paris cold winter ... or me!

Tatyana@MySecretGarden said...

Beautiful and no care required - it's my dream!

claudia said...

Each visit on your blog is a treat. Thanks, have a nice day!

Ann said...

Hi Titania,

It is such a coinidence my Sis Grace who lived in Australia for more tha 10 years, now living in Singapore if I know this Hibiscus without the stamen. I checked in my Singapore and asked if she meant your flower.

It was, My grandfather used to grow this shrub. we called it the sunflower. In the morning, it is white, and slowly turns to pink and very pink in the evening.